Get to know your natives

Nathalie Gits
Native basil

Native basil

WHAT The Australian native basil, aka Plectranthus graveolens, is also called bush basil, native coleus or sticky cockspur. The shrub grows up to 1.5 m with a width of about 2m and bears violet tube-like flowers in December to April (under the Sydney climate). The leaves have a dented margin and both sides are covered in a dense coating of fine silky hairs and soft.     WHERE The native basil is native to rocky mountain and rainforest terrains from the South East part of New South Wales. HOW The leaves are used fresh or dried and can be harvest all-year-round....

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Nathalie Gits
Anise Myrtle

Anise Myrtle

WHAT The anise myrtle, sometimes called aniseed myrtle or ringwood (Syzygium anisatum​, formerly known as Backhousia anisata), is a large bushy tree that can reach up to 25 meters. The anise myrtle trees are usually trimmed when grown commercially. The leaves are about 9cm long, shiny green with a wavy margin. The tree flowers in spring with clusters of anise-scented white fluffy flowers. WHERE The anise myrtle is native from Northern New South Wales and Southern Queensland. It can be successfully grown as far South as Melbourne in Victoria.   HOW The mature leaves of the anise myrtle tree are...

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Wattleseed

Wattleseed

WHAT The wattleseed is the seed of the wattle tree. There are about 1000 species of wattles (Acacia) endemic to Australia and they represent the largest group of flowering plants in Australia! Only a dozen of wattles have seeds that are safe to eat. The most common are the mulga wattle (Acacia aneura), the golden wattle (Acacia pycnantha), the silver wattle (Acacia retinodes) and the coastal wattle (Acacia longifolia var. sophorae). A mainstay of the diet of Indigenous Australians for over 40,000 years, Wattleseed was traditionally ground and used to make a flour. With a hard husk that protects the...

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Tasmanian Pepper

Tasmanian Pepper

Tasmanian pepper, Mountain pepper or Pepper berry... No matter its appellation, you will remember its powerful and distinctive flavour. A mere fresh berry can leave you with eye watering, mouth-numbing sensations. This is why we have carefully crafted our syrup, to ensure you get a pleasantly unique experience. During the cooking process, the Tasmanian pepper loses some of its heat. Our slow heating process allows the floral taste of the berries to be released.

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